Rome, Italy

Arch of Constantine

The Arch of Constantine is located right between the Palatine Hill and the Colosseum, and therefore it is convenient for tourists to visit all three attractions in one go.

It is an arch of triumphal in the city of Rome. The arch was erected in 312 to commemorate the victory of Constantine I at the Milvian Bridge battle and it was dedicated in 315. The arch was constructed in the Corinthian order architectural style. It is 7.4 meters deep, 25.9 meters wide, and 21 meters high. The Arch of Constantine has three popular archways; two of the archways are both 7.4 meters high and 3.4 meters wide, while the third — which is the central one — is 11.5 meters high and 6.5 meters wide.

The Arch of Constantine is the largest of all the triumphal arches of Rome. It spans the route that the emperors of Rome took when they got back to the city triumphantly. This route is known as the Via triumphalis. Many of the decorations on the Arch of Constantine depict earlier work from the days of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius (161-180), Emperor Hadrian (117-138) and Emperor Trajan (98-117). The Arch of Constantine is the only Roman arch that made extensive use of spolia.

The arch is the last of the many triumphal Roman arches. It reused many vital reliefs from the imperial monuments of the second century; this gives a famous and striking stylish contrast to the new sculptures of the arch. The attic is placed above the archways and it is made of marble and brickwork. Facing the Palatine Hill on the western side of the arch, is the entrance to a staircase within the arch. The Arch of Constantine is decorated with astonishing statues, some of which were amazingly carved in a taught provoking manner. The ancient arch has survived ages and time unscathed. Of the three famous remaining Roman imperial triumphal arches which include the Arch of Constantine, the Arch of Septimius Severus and the Arch of Titus, the Arch of Constantine is the most recent. Some of the statues located at the top of the arch were brought to the tourist attraction from the Trajan Forum and they depict the Trajan army’s victory and the captured soldiers of Dacian. Many of the roundels figures were designed to look like Constantine. The arch and the roundel are from Hadrian’s time. Between the statues are relief panels that were specifically created for Marcus Aurelius.

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