Rome, Italy

Campo de’ Fiori

Campo de’ Fiori is a rectangular square that is located at the border between Rione Regola and Rione Parione, and is a very popular tourist attraction in Rome. Campo de’ Fiori is in the south of Piazza Navona.

Translated literally from the Italian language, Campo de’ Fiori means “field of flowers.” Campo de’ Fiori was a field filled with flowers before the square started taking shape in the mid-fifteenth century. The Santa Brigida church that presently faces the Piazza Farnese was the first building that appeared in the vicinity. It was constructed then as part of the city improvement project.

Visiting the Campo de’ Fiori helps to understand the Roman life. The attraction is colorful and noisy with interesting events happening simultaneously all around. Campo de’ Fiori hosts one of the best markets in Rome during the day and at night the tourist destination morphs into a noisy open-air hub for the lovers of nightlife.

For centuries, the square was a site for public executions. Numerous executions took place at the Campo de’ Fiori; many heretics and criminals were severely tortured and eventually killed, many were hanged and lots were burned alive at the stake. Lots of unfortunate people were thrown into boiling oil while others faced more gruesome penalties.

Giordano Bruno the philosopher, dominican friar, astronomer and mathematician was one of these that were burned alive at the square in 1600 for heresy. The execution spot is marked by the hooded monk sinister statue that was built by Ettore Ferrari in the late nineteenth century.

The attraction is always bustling in the morning with people walking up and down among vegetable and fruit stands while the bars and restaurants open at night for businesses. The lively market at Campo de’ Fiori is very popular for the sales and purchases of vegetables, fish, meat, fruits, flowers and spices. The market dates back to the medieval days. It was initially located on the Olitorium before it was moved to the Capitoline Hill foot and to the Piazza Navona before it was eventually settled in 1869 at the Campo de’ Fiori.

It is highly recommended for visitors to explore the historical streets that are near the square. These streets include the Via Dei Giubbonari, Via Dei Cappellari and Via Dei Baullari, which has a great lineup of small shops assortments that are named after popular craftsmen who worked there during their lifetime.

The Fontana della Terrina was built on the Campo de’ Fiori in the late sixteen century to provide fresh water to the neighborhood. The fresh water was supplied by an Aqua Virgo Aqueduct branch. The fountain was moved to the front of Chiesa Nuovo in Piazza in the early twentieth century where it remains till this date. The movement was to pave the way for the Giordano Bruno monument.

Visitors have the opportunity to enjoy different varieties of astonishing restaurants all around the square with fresh fruits, pasta, sauces, veggies, wines and lots more.

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