Rome, Italy

Piazza Venezia

The popular Piazza Venezia is a Roman central hub, where many roads intersect. Among the various routes that intersect at the Piazza Venezia are the famous Via del Corso and the Via dei Fori Imperiali.

The Piazza Venezia is a square that features an intricate Victorian monument which the locals simply call “the typewriter,” because it has the shape of a typewriter. The site of the Unknown Soldier’s tomb of Italy in the Altare della Patria, is on one side of the Piazza.

The tourist attraction is located next to the Trajan’s Forum at the base of the Capitoline Hill. The main route, which is the Viale di Fori Imperiali, starts there and links the Colosseum via the Roman Forum. The remains of the Athenaeum of Emperor Hadrian were removed during the 2009 excavations of the square center to enhance the construction of another metro line in the city of Rome.

Located in the heart of the city, Piazza Venezia is a short stroll to some of the most popular tourist attractions of Rome such as the Pantheon, Roman Forum and the Capitoline Hill. Unlike the Piazza Navona and the Piazza del Popolo — where visitors can relax with some tranquility — the Piazza Venezia is livelier and dominated by chaotic traffic.

Il Vittoriano is a major landmark that dominates the Piazza Venezia. The building is a monument that was dedicated to the first Italian king – Victor Emmanuel II. The gorgeous monument was made of white marble. A handful of historical buildings were removed on the Capitoline Hill to make the Il Vittoriano more open and visible. Palazzetto Venezia was moved to another location because it was obstructing the view of the magnificent monument from Via del Corso. The monument offers impressive views from different perspectives and an astonishing architectural masterpiece for people to admire.

Piazza Venezia was actually named after a building called the Palazzo Venezia. The building is by the left if you look down towards the square from the Il Vittoriano. Palazzo Venezia was built in the middle of the fifteenth century by cardinal Pietro Barbo who later became pope Paul II. Palazzo Venezia is one of the oldest buildings of the Renaissance period in the city of Rome. Today, the building is used as a home to a museum with various collections of ancient items such as early Renaissance paintings, tapestry, decorative arts, sculptures, suits of armour and ceramics. A Palazzo Generali is directly across the Palazzo Venezia. The structure was constructed in the early twentieth century to replace two palazzos that were demolished to expand the square in 1900.

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